For Release: Thursday, August 8, 2013 

National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame to Induct Four Women

Emmy-winning costume designer and artist, Texas A&M veterinary medicine dean, world champion barrel racer and Cattle Queen of Texas to join 211 honorees in Hall of Fame on Oct. 24, 2013; photographs available on request

Fort Worth, Texas – National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame (www.cowgirl.net) will induct four accomplished women into its Hall of Fame at its 38th Annual Induction Luncheon Ceremony on Thursday, Oct. 24, 2013, at the Will Rogers Memorial Center, Round Up Inn, 3400 Burnett-Tandy Drive, 76102.


The 2013 honorees are:

 

•  Eleanor Green, DVM, a pioneer for women in equine veterinary medicine for four decades, is the first female dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. Her many other firsts in the profession include being the first female president of three national veterinary associations, the American Association of Equine Practitioners, American Board of Veterinary Practitioners, and American Association of Veterinary Clinicians.


 Cathy A. Smith of Santa Fe, N.M., is an artist dedicated to preserving the history of the 19th century cowboy/girl and the Plains Indians. Her expansive knowledge is expressed through painting, bead and quillwork, motion picture costume design, and historical consultation. Her work in the epic Western film starring Kevin Costner, “Dances with Wolves,” set the standard for authenticity in Western filmmakingShe has over 35 Western films to her credit includingComanche Moon and Geronimo.” She received an Emmy for Excellence in Costume Design for the television miniseries,” Son of the Morning Star.”


 Mary Walker of Ennis, Texas, the 2012 Women’s Professional Rodeo Association World Champion barrel racer, is a Texas native who showed determination and tremendous strength after overcoming a life-shattering tragedy and a debilitating injury. After months of physical therapy, she became the second-oldest woman, at age 53, to win the 2012 world title. Still competing, this athlete is currently ranked number two in world standings.


•  Elizabeth “Lizzie Johnson” Williams (1840‒1924), who ranched near Austin, was a pioneer in breaking the barrier into what had always been considered a man’s world: cattle trading. Legend has it that she was one of the first women to drive her own cattle, along with her husband’s, up the Chisholm Trail, earning her the nickname, “The Cattle Queen of Texas.”


“These inspiring role models are fitting additions to the other 211 extraordinary Honorees in the Hall of Fame,” said Patricia Riley, executive director of the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame. The Cowgirl preserves the history and highlights the impact of extraordinary Western women from the mid-1800s to the present: the artists and writers, champions and competitive performers, entertainers, ranchers (stewards of land and livestock), trailblazers, and pioneers.

About the Luncheon and Induction Ceremony
Approximately 700 are expected to attend the luncheon and induction ceremony. The event begins at 11 a.m. with a champagne reception and viewing of Western-style table centerpieces created by 80 designers and a festive bazaar of Western clothing, accessories, and gifts, followed by the luncheon and induction ceremony. For ticket information, email Emmy Lou Prescott at emmylou@cowgirl.net or call 817-336-4475. 

About the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame
Established in 1975, the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame is the only museum in the world dedicated to honoring and celebrating women, past and present, whose lives exemplify the courage, resilience, and independence that helped shape the American West. Fostering an appreciation of the ideals and spirit of self-reliance these extraordinary women inspire, the Cowgirl is the legacy of legends. The museum is considered an invaluable national educational resource for its exhibits, research library, rare photograph collection, and award-winning distance-learning programs for grades K-12 and adults.


Located at 1720 Gendy Street, Fort Worth, Texas 76107, the Cowgirl is open Monday (summers only) from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Admission is $8 for children ages 3 to 12 and senior citizens (60+) and $10 for adults (ages 13+). Members of National Cowgirl Museum AND Fort Worth Museum of Science and History receive FREE admission; HALF PRICE exhibit admission to the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History with paid admission to the National Cowgirl Museum; discount available on date of visit only. Group rates and docent tours available with two-week advance notice. Cultural District parking: $5.
For more information, call (817) 336-4475, or visit www.cowgirl.net.

 

More about the 2013 Inductees


Eleanor Green, DVM


Dr. Eleanor Green currently serves as the first female dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences at Texas A&M University. She was one of only three women in her graduating class of 100 from Auburn University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Her perseverance was easily recognizable. After four years as a partner-owner of a veterinary practice, she became one of the founding faculty members and the first female veterinarian of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Mississippi State University in 1976. 
Dr. Green has a long list of other firsts:

  • the first woman in the nation to officiate at a National Intercollegiate Livestock Judging Contest (1974);
  • the first female department head of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and Large Animal Hospital Director at the University of Tennessee;
  • the first female department chair of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and Large Animal Hospital Chief of Staff at the University of Florida;
  • the first woman in the history of both Auburn University’s and MSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine to deliver the commencement address;
  • the first female president of three national veterinary associations, the American Association of Equine Practitioners, American Board of Veterinary Practitioners, and American Association of Veterinary Clinicians.

This scholar is also a passionate horsewoman and has owned and shown horses for nearly 60 years winning numerous circuit and state championships. She has also served on the boards of directors of a number of horse industry organizations. Green is a true leader in the industry.


Cathy A. Smith


Cathy A. Smith has dedicated her career to preserving history through her stunning artwork. Her body of work and expertise on the 19th century cowboy/girl and the Plains Indians are incomparable.
She grew up on an old-time cattle ranch in western South Dakota, recording the stories of her grandfather and other old open-range cowboys. As a young adult, she worked on a ranch flanked by two Lakota Sioux Reservations and apprenticed with one of the last authentic medicine men of Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation, Kenneth Young Bear. Through their connection, she became an authority on the material culture, costume, religion, and lifestyle of the Plains Indians. These experiences fueled her interest, passion, and ultimate lifework as an artist to create and share her expansive knowledge through various mediums including painting, bead and quillwork, motion picture costume design, and historical consultation.
Her work on the epic Western film starring Kevin Costner, “Dances with Wolves,”set the standard for authenticity in Western filmmaking and resulted in the costume designer for the film earning an Oscar nomination. She herself received an Emmy for Excellence in Costume Design for the television miniseries, “Son of the Morning Star.” She has over 35 Western films to her credit includingComanche Moon andGeronimo.”
Smith has exhibited cowboy and Indian regalia, bead and quillwork, paintings, and costumes at museums and major art shows worldwide, and she lectures on the art and culture of the American West. Her studio is near Santa Fe, N.M., where she continues to create, consult on films, and teach. She  maintains her family ranch in the Black Hills of South Dakota, spending her summers there and in Montana, riding her cutting horse, participating in ceremonies in Indian Country, and living the West.


Mary Walker


The 2012 Women’s Professional Rodeo Association World Champion barrel racer, Mary Walker, is a Texas native who showed determination and tremendous strength after overcoming a life-shattering tragedy and a debilitating injury.
She married a world champion steer wrestler and was mother to a rising rodeo star son until he was tragically killed on April 23, 2011, in a car accident. A little over a month after his death, she was competing and fell, and her horse, Latte, fell hard on top of her. Coupling the inconceivable pain of losing a child with the physical pain of a shattered pelvis, broken hip bone, two fractured vertebrae, and two broken toes, she endured a challenging year of emotional and physical recovery. Her goal was to walk, get back on her horse, and ultimately to qualify for the National Finals Rodeo.
In 2012, after months of physical therapy, Walker surpassed all of her ambitions, becoming the second-oldest woman, at age 53, to win the world title. Still competing, this athlete is currently ranked number two in world standings.


Elizabeth “Lizzie Johnson” Williams (1840‒1924)


As a young woman with a variety of capabilities, Elizabeth “Lizzie Johnson” Williams taught at a school owned by her parents, learned bookkeeping for local cattlemen, and also received wages writing stories using a pen name for Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Weekly in New York City. This produced enough money for her to invest stock in a Chicago cattle company. She turned $2,500 into $20,000 by the time she sold it only three years later.
In 1871, with her earned money, she registered a Longhorn brand under her name and began acquiring her own herd; shortly afterward, she purchased 10 acres of land in Austin. In 1879 in her late thirties, she married a widower, Hezekiah Williams, who also had his own registered brand and herd. Before marrying, they signed a prenuptial agreement stating that her finances and property would remain her own— a highly unusual move at the time, yet a prudent one considering that Williams was a gambler, fond of drink, and continually in debt.
When her husband ran into financial trouble and needed her financial assistance, she—with an advanced concept of property value— provided him the money, but with the keen understanding that it was a loan with expected reimbursement. Spurred by their mutual interest and owning their own herds, she and her husband drove their cattle up the Chisholm Trail together. Legend has it that she was one of the first women to drive her own cattle to market, earning her the nickname, “The Cattle Queen of Texas.” She broke the barrier into what had always been considered a man’s world: cattle trading. When she died, she had amassed an estate that would be valued in 2013 at over a million dollars.